Courses

Fall 2023 Courses

CST 200A - J. Sze History of Cultural Studies: Genealogies of Cultural Studies: Histories and traditions of cultural studies internationally; multiple legacies of cultural studies as a field of inquiry in various geographical contexts; foregrounds important critical perspectives resulting from social and intellectual movements worldwide. 

Wed: 9:00am-11:50am


CST 290 - Colloquium: CST Speaker Series. Designed to provide cohort identity and faculty-student exchange. Opportunity to present papers, hear guest lecturers, and see faculty presentations, gather for organizational and administrative news, exchange information, and make announcements. 

Thur: 4:10pm - 6:00pm


AFFILIATE COURSES


AHI 290 - H. Watenpaugh Problems in Art History: Special research seminar in the theory or methods of Art History, or in a period of Art History. Topic varies. 

Mon 1:10pm-4:00pm


ANT 201 - L. Zhang Ethnographies/Theories: Critical readings of selected ethnographies that examine a wide range of important topics and analytical issues in social and cultural anthropology. Emphasis on how and why ethnographic writing has changed over time and its relationship with contemporary theoretical explorations. 

Tues: 12:30pm-3:20pm 


COM 210 - S. Lu - Topic: East-West Literary Relations, Comparative Poetics, Cross-cultural Modernity: Comparative, interpretive study of the treatment of specific topics and themes in literary works from various periods, societies, and cultures, in light of these works' historical and sociocultural contexts. 

This seminar tackles a set of three interrelated issues: East-West Literary Relations, Comparative Poetics, and Cross-Cultural Modernity. We begin with the cultural encounter between East and West and their changing perceptions of each other since the 18th century, the Enlightenment, and European Romanticism. We look at how comparative poetics has become an important field of East-West comparative literature and examine the methodology and feasibility of such comparison. At the same time, we conduct a comparative study of discourses of modernity between East and West and from around the world. We look at how theoretical discourses and aesthetic practices in the West appropriate and build upon non-Western traditions; how Asia and other cultures offer alternative narratives of modernity in a global framework.

Thurs: 2:10pm-5:00pm


GER 297 - C. Zhang - JusticeSpecial topics in German literature.

Tues: 2:10pm-5:00pm


GSW 201 - C. Hanssmann - Special Topics in Feminist Theory and Research: In-depth exploration of a topic of feminist theory and research related to the interests of the instructor. 

Thurs. 1:10pm-4:00pm 


STS 200 - C. Milburn - Theories and Methods in Science and Technology Studies: Theories and methods of Science & Technology Studies as a field of critical and empirical scholarship, and examination of various contexts in which STS has emerged worldwide. 

Tues: 9:00am-11:50am

Winter 2024 Courses

CST 200B  - J. Fort - Theories of Cultural Studies

Definitions of "critical" scholarship and examination of various contexts in which cultural studies theory has emerged worldwide. Both mainstream and alternative theoretical traditions, such as those developed by people of color and by other minoritized groups.

Tue: 3:10pm - 6:00pm


CST 250  - G. Wang -  Research Seminar

This seminar focuses on the preparation and writing of a draft dissertation prospectus in the qualitative interdisciplinary field of cultural studies. A dissertation prospectus is a distinct genre that can vary somewhat in its characteristics depending on specific field(s). During the quarter you will write components of the prospectus and critique each other’s work. By the end of the quarter you will have a workable initial draft of a dissertation prospectus.

While our work will focus on developing a working draft for your dissertation prospectus, we will also attend to other important writing opportunities such as academic journal articles, grant proposals, and public-facing, activist-oriented scholarship. This seminar should provide you space to think about how all these writing activities might fit within the developing trajectory of your research, scholarship, and public engagement.

Tue: 2:10pm - 5:00pm  


CST 290 - Colloquium: CST Speaker Series.  

Designed to provide cohort identity and faculty student exchange. Opportunity to present papers, hear guest lecturers, and see faculty presentations, gather for organizational and administrative news, exchange information, and make announcements.

Thur: 4:10pm - 6:00pm


AFFILIATE COURSES

GSW 200A - R. Jaleel - Current Issues in Feminist Theory 

This seminar examines current issues in feminist theory, techniques employed to build feminist theory in various fields.  

Mon: 3:10pm - 6:00pm


ENL 233 - M. Jerng - Law and Literature: Racial Differentiation, Social Life, and Speculative Knowledge

This seminar has two research areas that we will work to put into dialogue: 1) genealogies of critical race theory in legal studies; 2) speculative writing. With the first, we will focus on the ways in which critical race theorists have analyzed the law and its reproduction of norms of freedom, property, contract, personhood, corporations, and violence. We will think through the law as a regulatory apparatus that uses grammars and conventions such as the counterfactual, precedent in-place-of history, tort, causation, and testimony. With the second, we will focus on writers using practices of speculation across various modes of writing (historical speculation; what ifs; time-travel; science fiction) that invite alternative knowledge structures, ways of being and making realities possible, and worldbuilding. We will develop our approaches for thinking across legal and literary modes of thinking. We will have some explicit help in the form of the legal theorist Derrick Bell whose major critical work consists in large part of speculative fiction. Throughout we will decipher intersections across law and speculative writing that reproduce and legitimize modes of individuality, freedom, incorporation, justice, contract, and property-making entangled with racial capitalism. But we will cultivate re-imaginings of sociality, collectivization, and sense-making drawing from the speculative worldmaking of Bell, Octavia Butler, Cherie Dimaline, W.E.B. DuBois, N.K. Jemisin, Victor Lavalle, Rebecca Roanhorse, and Patricia Williams, among others

Mon: 12:10pm - 3:00pm


STS 205 - F. Brunton - The Priors: Archives, Preservation, Libraries

The goal of this seminar is to think about the role of archives and libraries in the production of knowledge, particularly in areas pertinent to STS. Along with a review of the canonical STS literature and theories on the subject, we will be exploring unorthodox or less studied forms of preservation, archival collection, and librarianship. These will include shadow libraries like libgen, Sci-Hub, Monoskop, and Anna's Archive; emergent collections like the Archangel Ancient Tree Archive; biomedical data collection and preservation practices; seed banks and botanical gardens; the Prelinger Archive and their approach to moving image preservation; documenting and preserving ephemeral knowledge, bodily techniques, practices, and performance; data management and data friction for ultra-large-scale materials in domains like climate and high energy physics research; and the role of all of these and more in the production, not just maintenance, of knowledge itself. 

Tues: 1:10pm - 4:00pm


ANT 210/PFS 265A - C. Giordano - Getting Caught: A collaboration on and off stage between theater and anthropology

This graduate seminar is an exploration of and a cross pollination between research and narrative practices in theater and anthropology. By creating a dialogue between these disciplines in a laboratory format, we explore techniques that will enrich our engagement with anthropological questions and embodied production.

We simultaneously engage theatrical devising practices, anthropological modes of attending to forms of life, and affect and post-dramatic theories, to practice what we call Affect Theater. This is not a seminar on the anthropology of theater nor an acting or playwrighting class. In this practice, theatrical devices will provide us with tools to analyze our findings through the body and the embodiment of narratives in space. By exploring our research through the elements of the stage (lights, sets, objects, sound, bodies etc.), theater can teach social scientists and artists to engage the empirical more viscerally in their writing. Anthropological listening to the intricacies of stories that are embedded and woven within specific worlds can broaden and deepen the ways in which theater makers and performers render narratives for the stage. This practice can inspire new forms of writing and production (essays, plays, short stories, installations, performance pieces etc.), or revitalize existing practice of academic writing.

We will engage a body of empirical material gathered by my collaborator Rima Praspaliauskiene who will participate in the seminar. Rima is currently working on a memoir project about growing up in a working-class family with a grandmother, an illiterate fortuneteller in Soviet-occupied Lithuania. As a historian and anthropologist Rima will share with us the ethnographic and archival material around her grandmother Veronika’s experiences of two World Wars, the Bolshevik revolution, the holocaust, and the unraveling of the Soviet Empire. Through the process of Affect Theater, we will further explore this material and discover new ways of approaching and rendering it for the page and the stage.

Wed: 9:00am - 11:50am


EDU 235 - C. Whithaus - Critical Pedagogy 

This seminar focuses on developing socio-cultural critiques of educational systems. We examine how critical pedagogy intersects with contemporary social justice movements. Participants consider how students, teachers, and community members can advocate for reform and change. We stress interdisciplinary perspectives that cut across emphasis areas within education and reach across the social sciences, humanities, and STEM fields. Much of our work will consider how social power differences are perpetuated through educational systems, the texts they value, and the learning activities they encourage.
We'll read foundational works within critical pedagogy such as Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed and bell hooks’ Teaching to Transgress. We will also turn to books by contemporary researchers: April Baker-Bell’s Linguistic Justice: Black Language, Literacy, Identity, and Pedagogy, Aja Martienez’s Counterstory: The Rhetoric and Writing of Critical Race Theory, and works recommended by seminar participants. suggest. Other readings will include recent works from scholars such as Anita Casavantes Bradford and Alberto Eduardo Morales, Geneva Smitherman, Ernest Morrell, Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang, Nelson Flores and Jonathan Rosa, and Asao Inoue. 

Wed: 9:00am - 11:50am

Spring 2024 Courses

CST 200C  - S. Maira - Practices of Cultural Studies

Methodological and practical applications of cultural studies research. Critical analyses of ethnography, textual analysis, social change, community development, and identity formation. Emphasis given to students' unique versions of cultural studies practices. 

Thur: 10:00am - 12:50pm


CST 210/HMR 200B  - C. Walker - Memory, Culture, & Human Rights

Explores the multiple convergences among memory, culture, and human rights. Discusses diverse approaches to how societal actors in different historical, cultural, and national settings, construct meanings of past political violence, inter-group conflicts, and human rights struggles.

Mon: 3:10pm - 6:00pm


CST 290 Colloquium: CST Speaker Series.  

Designed to provide cohort identity and faculty-student exchange. Opportunity to present papers, hear guest lecturers, and see faculty presentations, gather for organizational and administrative news, exchange information, and make announcements.

Thur: 4:10pm - 6:00pm


AFFILIATE COURSES

 

ANT 210 - M. De la Cadena; J. Dumit

Analysis of various phases of culture, such as religion, economics, law, and folklore. May be repeated for credit when topic differs.

Wed: 2:10pm - 5:00pm


GSW 200B  - B. Jafri - Problems in Feminist Research

Application of feminist theoretical perspectives to the interdisciplinary investigation of a problem or question chosen by the instructor(s). 
 
Wed: 10:00am -12:50pm

GER 297 - J. Fischer - National vs Transnational: European Co-Productions in the EU Era

This seminar will examine a special case of post-1990 European cinema, namely, efforts at art-cinema co-productions undertaken by two or more countries. European nations have long sought to find a niche in the global film market by producing art-cinema films related to various national cinemas (as in Italian neorealism, French New Wave, New German Cinema, Romanian New Wave, etc.), but there has also been a group of films, many funded in part by the EU (e.g., via its MEDIA program) or by other cross-border schemes like ARTE that foreground, even thematize, their co-production status. Part of their goal is produce films that will be of interest in global film markets, but, often, they also seek to highlight how identities can and often do transcend national borders, not least via images underscoring themes of mobility, migration, and diaspora/refuge – indeed, a “European” or cosmopolitan identity is a complex term and notion, but often the goal of these kinds of films. The course will examine the history of such cross-border co-productions, including works by directors like Krzysztof Kieslowski, the Dardennes brothers, Fatih Akin, Michael Haneke, Jessica Hausner, Mati Diop, Christian Petzold, Céline Sciamma, and Claire Denis. In addressing these films, the seminar will consider the dominant genres that have emerged for this kind of cinema aiming to carve out a niche in the world film market, including neorealist melodrama, urban thrillers, (quasi) horror films, and historical costume drama.

Thurs: 2:10pm-5:00pm


SOC 230  - M. Craig - Sociology of Race and Racism

Advanced study of the determinants of ethnic groupings and their interrelationships. Major theme will be the patterns of ethnic stratification and causes of ethnic conflict. Specific focus upon dominance and resistance to dominance. Influence of social science research.
 
Tues: 12:10pm -3:00pm

Courses

The course listings on this page are also listed in the UC Davis General CatalogNot all courses are available every year. Quarterly course selection is determined by evaluating student need/interests and availability of affiliate faculty. 

CST Full Course List

200A. Histories of Cultural Studies (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Undergraduate coursework in the humanities or social sciences recommended. Histories and traditions of cultural studies internationally; multiple legacies of cultural studies as a field of inquiry in various geographical contexts; foregrounds important critical perspectives resulting from social and intellectual movements worldwide.—F. (F.) 

200B. Theories of Cultural Studies (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A or consent of instructor. Definitions of "critical" scholarship and examination of various contexts in which cultural studies theory has emerged worldwide. Both mainstream and alternative theoretical traditions, such as those developed by people of color and by other minoritized groups.—W. (W.) 

200C. Practices of Cultural Studies (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: courses 200A and 200B or consent of instructor. Methodological and practical applications of cultural studies research. Critical analyses of ethnography, textual analysis, social change, community development, and identity formation. Emphasis given to students' unique versions of cultural studies practices.—S. (S.)

204. History and Theory of Sexualities (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor. Studies of sexuality in feminist, literary, historical, and cultural studies research, specifically examining the emergence of "sexuality" as a field of research and the relationship of sexuality studies to cultural forms, subjectivity, and social relations generally. May be repeated two times for credit. Offered irregularly.—F. (F.) 

206. Studies in Race Theory (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor. Theoretical framework for the critical study of race, drawing on contemporary cultural studies and postcolonial scholarship in order to understand the social production of "race" as a category for organizing social groups and determining group processes. Offered irregularly.—W. (W.) 

208. Studies in Nationalism, Transnationalism, and Late Capitalism (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor. Contemporary theories of nation, nationalism, postcolonialism, and transnationalism. Specific attention to the relationship between cultural production and the formation of ideas about nation and nationalism, including examination of both "legitimizing" and resistant discourses. Offered irregularly.—S. (S.) 

210. Memory, Culture, and Human Rights (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Restricted to graduate students. Explores the multiple convergences among memory, culture, and human rights. Discusses diverse approaches to how societal actors in different historical, cultural, and national settings, construct meanings of past political violence, inter-group conflicts, and human rights struggles. (Same course as Human Rights 200B.) Offered in alternate years.—F. Lazzara

212. Studies in the Rhetorics of Culture (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor. Survey of critical and analytical approaches to the study of texts. Examination of multi-mediated objects to understand their cultural import by focusing on discursive production, dispersal, and reception processes, and related shifts in power relations. Offered irregularly.—F. (F.) 

214. Studies in Political and Cultural Representations (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A (may be taken concurrently) and consent of graduate adviser. Framework for the analysis of political and popular cultural representations. Emphasis on concepts, theories, and methodologies illuminating dominant and vernacular cultural representation, appropriation, and innovation in transnational contexts. May be repeated for credit up to 4 times when topic differs. Offered irregularly.—W. (W.)

250. Research Seminar (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: courses 200A, 200B, 200C or consent of instructor. Designed to facilitate student interaction and promote student research by guiding students through the production of a publishable essay. Essays submitted, distributed, and discussed by seminar participants. May be repeated up to 12 units of credit.—W. (W.)

270A. Individually Guided Research in Cultural Studies (4)

Discussion—1 hour; independent study—2 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 200C, 250, consent of instructor. Individually guided research, under the supervision of a faculty member, on a Cultural Studies topic related to the student's proposed dissertation project to produce a dissertation prospectus.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

270B. Individually Guided Research in Cultural Studies (4)

Discussion—1 hour; independent study—2 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 200C, 250, consent of instructor. Individually guided research, under the supervision of a faculty member, on a Cultural Studies topic related to the student's proposed dissertation project to produce a dissertation prospectus.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

270C. Individually Guided Research in Cultural Studies (4)

Discussion—1 hour; independent study—2 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 200C, 250, consent of instructor. Individually guided research, under the supervision of a faculty member, on a Cultural Studies topic related to the student's proposed dissertation project to produce a dissertation prospectus.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

290. Colloquium (1)

Lecture—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Designed to provide cohort identity and faculty student exchange. Opportunity to present papers, hear guest lecturers, and see faculty presentations, gather for organizational and administrative news, exchange information, and make announcements. May be repeated up to 12 units of credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

295. Special Topics (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Special topics courses offered according to faculty and student interests and demands. May be repeated for credit with consent of adviser.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

298. Group Research (1-5)

(S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

299. Directed Research (1-5)

(S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

299D. Dissertation Research (1-12)

Independent study—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: advancement to doctoral candidacy. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

Professional

396. Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4)

Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)